Social media for journalists: Part two – using LinkedIn, Facebook and forums to get work

September 18, 2011 Joanne Mallon 6

Social-media-journalists

Following on from the post about how journalists can start using Twitter for work, this is part two of my presentation to the Guild of Health Writers - here we're looking at other forms of social media including LinkedIn and Facebook.

(It was at this point in the presentation that I realised I had far too much to say.)

Using LinkedIn to get work as a journalist

  • Fill in your profile to get your name at the top in Google searches
    LinkedIn ranks incredibly highly in search engines, so if somebody Googles your name (and editors will), your profile will pop up at the top. Particularly useful if you don't have a website for your journalism work (though frankly, you should). 
  • Link your profile to your Twitter feed
    If you're using Twitter to circulate case study or other requests, link the two so both networks will see it.
  • Ask for recommendations
    Get people you've worked with to fill in a LinkedIn recommendation to add to your credibility.
  • Include keywords in your profile relating to services you can offer
    Recruiters are searching, so make it easier for them to find you. Nobody can offer you work if they don't know what you've got to offer.
  • Join groups relevant to your specialism
    There're thousands of professional groups on LinkedIn, so there's bound to be a special little haven for you.
  • Check out potential clients
    If you've got a meeting coming up with an editor, check out their LinkedIn profile to get the cut of their gib. *stalker alert*

 

 

Social media for journalists: Part one – Twitter for beginners

September 16, 2011 Joanne Mallon 4

Vermeer-ladies-computer-laptop

These notes are extracted from a talk given to the Guild of Health Journalists on 14th September 2011. If you're interested in this subject then you might want to also have a read of the post about 10 things Twitter can do for journalists.

We started with some general points about using social media:

  • It's a conversation, not a broadcast
    Don't just pump out updates –  talk to people, jump into conversations, retweet their messages and see it as a two way flow.
  • Look for personal connections and work will find you
    If you go in explicitly and solely looking for work, you'll probably be disappointed. See it as a source of new contacts and ideas and the opportunities will occur.
  • Use your own name – that's your brand
    As a journalist, your byline is your brand, so don't tweet as your dog or your porn star name. The exception to this would be if you have a blog with an established name, in which case you might want to create a specific Twitter account just for that.
  • Keep your photo consistent
    It's all about establishing you as a human being that other human beings will want to connect to and work with, so use the same photo across all social media and don't change it more than twice a year. Using the Hipstamatic App will produce the most flattering photo you've ever had.
  • Klout.com will track your progress
    If you like statistics, Klout will track how your social media network and influence is growing – useful if you're worried that you're wasting your time.

 

Social media mythbusting

September 15, 2011 Joanne Mallon 5

Twitter-funny-cat

I had a spiffing time last night talking about social media for journalists with the Guild of Health Writers in the (frankly rather elegant) surroundings of The Medical Society of London.

The thing that struck me when talking to peole who don't use Twitter or other social media tools was that it's the myths that seem to put people off. Myths including:

  • You have to be a tech-y gadget freak to make sense of it
  • It uses up all your time
  • Why would I be interested in what random strangers have for lunch?

Bloggers, what are your rules for reviews?

June 20, 2011 Joanne Mallon 13

Cat-blogger

Recently an ITV children's programme was censured by media regulator Ofcom for giving too positive a review to a product.

Let's hope Ofcom never start looking too closely at blog reviews, because when did you ever read one of those that was less than glowing?

I understand why that's the case – bloggers spend our own time writing reviews without pay. So why would you want to waste your efforts writing about something that you're not enthusiastic about?

Ever since I started doing more reviews on this blog, I have been thinking about what my review policy is.  This is what I've come up with so far. I would love to hear what guidelines you stick to when you do reviews.