Children’s book review: Lego Ninjago Brickmaster

 

lego ninjago brickmaster I used to wonder if Lego were trying to do slightly too much with the Ninjago range – it’s a construction toy, a trading cards game, a toy spinner, a collectible – and now with the release of LEGO Ninjago Brickmaster, it’s a book as well.

But what do I know – the range has become enormously popular. Last term it was the toy of choice to smuggle in to school for every small boy I know.

The Brickmaster range from DK is a sort of hybrid – half story book, half Lego building project. The left hand side of the book is a cardboard sleeve containing around 130 Lego bricks, designed to make at least five different models. The right hand side is a combination of the sort of Lego instructions you’ll know, but with extra text giving facts about the models and a story involving the escapades of Frakjaw, Skeleton of Fire.

So whilst it’s unlikely to win any prizes for literature, it’s a brilliant way to tempt anyone who’s reluctant to read into giving books a try. The child can read through small chunks of text and build the models as they go. A great, fun way to build up reading confidence.lego ninjago brickmaster inside

My eight year old son enjoyed testing out our preview copy of Ninjago Brickmaster, and was very engaged by the story and building the models. It kept him happily occupied for several days.

And I enjoyed the fact that it could all be packed away again in the cardboard sleeve when he was done. This would make a great gift or travel toy.

LEGO Ninjago Brickmaster is published (along with LEGO City Brickmaster) by DK on the 15th of August, RRP £18.99. Available in all good bookshops and online here. Suitable for age 6+

 

  • Thanks for your comment Inger. Sounds like this would be a good one for your son!

  • Hi Joanne
    Thanks for the review-it looks like a good book/kit/hybrid-thingy.
    My son has the Star Wars Brickmaster book and loves it, though the pieces ended up in his regular pile of Lego when I wasn’t looking.
    I agree that books like this are great for “reluctant readers”-of which my son is one.
    He also like comics as well-so a “visual” reader I suppose.
    Cheers
    Inger